Archives par étiquette : Pulitzer

WILMINGTON’S LIE de David Zucchino remporte le prix Pulitzer dans la catégorie non-fiction

Publié en janvier 2020 chez Grove Atlantic, le livre de David Zucchino intitulé WILMINGTON’S LIE: The Murderous Coup of 1898 and the Rise of White Supremacy vient de remporter le prestigieux prix Pulitzer dans la catégorie « General Nonfiction ».

WILMINGTON’S LIE porte sur le massacre de Wilmington en Caroline du Nord et les événements ayant mené au renversement violent, par les suprémacistes blancs, du gouvernement municipal élu. Cet événement marqua un tournant dans le durcissement de la ségrégation raciale qui s’imposa dans États du Sud jusqu’à la fin des années 1960. Le livre expose « un ensemble complexe de dynamiques de pouvoir transcendant les problématiques de race, de classe sociale et de genre. »

Les droits de langue française sont toujours disponibles.

Dan Fagin lauréat du Pulitzer 2014

Le prestigieux prix Pulitzer dans la catégorie « general non-fiction » vient d’être attribué à Dan Fagin pour son TOMS RIVER: A STORY OF SCIENCE AND SALVATION, publié en 2013 chez Bantam.

« Surely a new classic of science reporting » – The New York Times

« Absorbing and thoughtful » – USA Today

TOMS RIVER
A Story of Science and Salvation
by Dan Fagin
Bantam, March 2013

One of New Jersey’s seemingly innumerable quiet seaside towns, TOMS RIVER became the unlikely setting for a decades-long drama that culminated in 2001 with one of the largest legal settlements in the annals of toxic dumping. A town that would rather have been known for its Little League World Series champions ended up making history for an entirely different reason: a notorious cluster of childhood cancers scientifically linked to local air and water pollution. For years, large chemical companies had been using Toms River as their private dumping ground, burying tens of thousands of leaky drums in open pits and discharging billions of gallons of acid-laced wastewater into the town’s namesake river.

In an astonishing feat of investigative reporting, prize-winning journalist Dan Fagin recounts the sixty-year saga of rampant pollution and inadequate oversight that made Toms River a cautionary example for fast-growing industrial towns from South Jersey to South China. He tells the stories of the pioneering scientists and physicians who first identified pollutants as a cause of cancer, and brings to life the everyday heroes in Toms River who struggled for justice: a young boy whose cherubic smile belied the fast-growing tumors that had decimated his body from birth; a nurse who fought to bring the alarming incidence of childhood cancers to the attention of authorities who didn’t want to listen; and a mother whose love for her stricken child transformed her into a tenacious advocate for change.

A gripping human drama rooted in a centuries-old scientific quest, TOMS RIVER is a tale of dumpers at midnight and deceptions in broad daylight, of corporate avarice and government neglect, and of a few brave individuals who refused to keep silent until the truth was exposed.